Indiana Supreme Court

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The Indiana Supreme Court technology team, led by Justice Steven David and Court of Appeals judge Paul Mathias, has already begun negotiations to purchase the software needed to bring e-filing to all 92 Indiana counties. 

Mathias notes that the federal courts have already moved to e-filing, which he calls a new basic responsibility of government.

“The clerks’ shelf space at the state and local level, the postage, the copying, the collating, a person’s time all along the way -- e-filing will do away with,” Mathias says.

Scott Wagner / https://www.flickr.com/photos/lonewolfhdr/5694061342

Monroe County officials are beginning work on a program they hope will reduce the number of people in the county’s jail and keep offenders from missing court appointments.

Using a $40,000 grant from the Indiana Supreme Court, the Monroe County probation department will start what’s called a pretrial release program.

It consists of a probation officer meeting with low-level offenders, screening them, then recommending whether they should be released to home detention or another community corrections program instead of being kept in jail while they wait for a trial.

Larry Darling / https://www.flickr.com/photos/tncountryfan/

Does the Indiana Constitution require public schools to offer free transportation to their students?  That’s the question being considered by the state Supreme Court. 

Indianapolis' Franklin Township school system eliminated its busing service three years ago, saying property tax caps had squeezed the school corporation’s finances. 

Gretchen Frazee/WFIU News

The Indiana Supreme Court ruled against labor unions Thursday, upholding the state’s right-to-work law as constitutional.

The controversial measure, which sparked protests when the legislature passed it in 2012, bars union contracts that require non-members pay fees for representation.

The court unanimously rejected a union claim that the measure violates a provision of the Indiana Constitution that prohibits the state from demanding services without compensation.

Phil Jern / https://www.flickr.com/photos/pjern/5932984588

The ongoing legal battle between the state and computer giant IBM will have its day in front of the Indiana Supreme Court Thursday. 

The state hired IBM in 2006 to modernize its welfare system, signing a ten-year contract worth $1.3 billion. 

But the shift from human case workers to greater automation was beset by reported problems, and three years later Governor Mitch Daniels canceled the contract. 

Gretchen Frazee / http://indianapublicmedia.org/

Indiana’s Supreme Court justices suggested in oral arguments Thursday that unions’ problem with the state’s right to work law isn’t with the state. It’s with the federal government.

The court heard arguments today in a lawsuit the International Operating Engineers union brought against the state, challenging the controversial state statute.

Indiana’s right to work law bars union contracts that require non-members pay fees for representation.

Greta M. Scodro/Indiana Courts

Days after a federal appeals court upheld the state's 'right to work' law, the Indiana Supreme Court is set to hear arguments Thursday in two cases challenging the law.

The 2012 law bars making union dues a condition of employment, and allows people to join unions without paying any fee. Ed Maher with the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 150 calls it an unfair situation for unions, because they can be forced to use dues from paying members to provide services for workers who do not pay a union fee.

Phil Jern / https://www.flickr.com/photos/pjern/

3:00 p.m. update:

The federal 7th Circuit Court of Appeals Tuesday upheld Indiana’s Right to Work law as constitutional.  The ruling comes days before the law is challenged at the Indiana Supreme Court:

Indiana’s Right to Work law bans union contracts that require nonmembers pay fees for representation.  The International Operating Engineers union filed two lawsuits in the wake of the bill’s passage in 2012 – one in federal court, another in state court. 

Indiana's First Female Chief Justice To Be Sworn In Today

Aug 18, 2014
Brandon Smith / http://www.ipbs.org/

New Indiana Supreme Court Chief Justice Loretta Rush will be sworn in today, two weeks after her selection as the state's first female chief justice.

The former Tippecanoe County judge was appointed to the high court by former Governor Mitch Daniels in 2012.

Rush will replace current Chief Justice Brent Dickson, who announced in June that he would step down as chief justice but remain an associate justice.

Governor Mike Pence will administer the oath of office to Rush at the court's Statehouse law library.

Brandon Smith / http://www.ipbs.org/

Indiana Supreme Court Justice Loretta Rush will become Indiana’s new Chief Justice, the first woman to lead the state’s highest court.  Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Brandon Smith reports on the decision made Wednesday by the Judicial Nominating Commission:

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