U.S. Supreme Court

The U.S. Supreme Court won’t take the case of an Indiana man convicted of murder who says his lawyers weren’t good enough.

Jeffrey Weisheit was sentenced to death in 2013 for murdering two children in a fire he set. Weisheit appealed – he argued his lawyers did not provide him adequate counsel. For example, he says his attorneys didn’t work hard enough to get mental health records or call certain expert witnesses to help mitigate his sentence.

People rally outside the Statehouse in 2016 over an Indiana anti-abortion law. (FILE PHOTO: Brandon Smith/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Advocates on both sides of the abortion debate say the U.S. Supreme Court doesn’t appear any closer to overturning Roe v. Wade after its decision in an Indiana case Tuesday.

U.S. Supreme Court Could Hear Indiana Shoreline Dispute

Jan 16, 2019

The U.S. Supreme Court could take on an Indiana legal dispute over who should have access to Lake Michigan’s shoreline. The State of Indiana and a community group both filed briefs on Friday urging the court not to hear the case. 

Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) says he has “deep reservations” about President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and will vote against him. (Lauren Chapman/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) says he has “deep reservations” about President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and will vote against him.

Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) says he’ll continue to review Kavanaugh’s record and watch his confirmation hearing before he decides whether to back him. (Photo courtesy of Sen. Joe Donnelly's office)
Lauren Chapman

U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) met Wednesday with President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh for what the Hoosier lawmaker describes as a “wide-ranging conversation.”

U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) says he hasn’t made up his mind about President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. (Lauren Chapman/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) will meet Wednesday with President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Rob Crawley / flickr.com/photos/robcrawley/3114271990

The Indiana Public Retirement System is set to go before the U.S. Supreme Court next month, where justices will decide if it can sue a publicly-traded company for alleged securities fraud.

In June of 2011, Science Applications International Corporation – or SAIC – issued a statement to the market detailing how it was under a criminal investigation for a group of employees’ kickback scheme in New York City.

The Indiana public pension fund had bought stock in the company shortly beforehand, and claims that information should’ve been made public much earlier.

David / https://www.flickr.com/photos/bootbearwdc/37621686

Indiana and the city of South Bend are wading into a redistricting case set for oral arguments at the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday.

The justices will decide whether states can draw legislative districts based on the number of registered voters, rather than the total population. Two Texans are suing their state government, arguing the principle of "one man, one vote" is diluted by counting people who can't vote.

Zoeller Opens State's Playbook For Anti-EPA Lawsuit

Aug 6, 2015
Alan Berning / https://www.flickr.com/photos/14617207@N00/2621375759

Indiana and the other 14 states planning to sue to stop implementation of the Environmental Protection Agency’s new clean air standards have already begun to gameplan how they’ll make their case.

The states sued once before to stop the regulation -- an appeals court ruled they had to wait till the rule was final.

Brandon Smith / Indiana Public Broadcasting

The U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling upholding the Affordable Care Act's tax subsidies was a major victory for the Obama administration. The healthcare law is now two-for-two surviving challenges before he nation’s highest court. Butother lawsuits that could gut the bill still loom -- including a challenge out of Indiana.  

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