Courtney Dorning

Courtney Dorning has been a Senior Editor for NPR's All Things Considered since November 2018. In that role, she's the lead editor for the daily show. Dorning is responsible for newsmaker interviews, lead news segments and the small, quirky features that are a hallmark of the network's flagship afternoon magazine program.

Dorning has been the editor on interviews ranging from former First Lady Michelle Obama, actress and activist Jane Fonda and Speaker of the House. She contributes heavily to All Things Considered's political coverage and has played a key role in the show's coverage of the #MeToo movement. Previously, Dorning was an editor at Morning Edition.

Prior to joining NPR, she spent nearly ten years at ABC News as a researcher and producer. Dorning helped produce town meetings from Israel in 2000 and 2002, and was a key part of Nightline's award-winning coverage of Sept. 11 and the Iraq war.

Dorning lives just outside Washington, D.C., with her husband, three children and a black lab. Having a singleton and twins in 18 months has sharpened the multi-tasking skills and nerves of steel that are essential for editing two hours of daily live programming.

Dorning is a graduate of Saint Mary's College and has a master's degree from Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism.

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So a lot of problems over the weekend for Southwest Airlines - to talk more about it, let's bring in Captain Casey Murray. He's president of the Southwest Airlines Pilots Association. Welcome.

CASEY MURRAY: Thank you very much for having me.

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It's been 30 years since Anita Hill testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee that then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas had sexually harassed her when they worked together. Thomas denied the allegation.

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SARAH MCCAMMON, BYLINE: I'm Sarah McCammon on the bayou south of New Orleans, where just weeks ago, Hurricane Ida slammed ashore, its 150-mile-an-hour winds causing death and devastation across the region.

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The Hammond organ makes a singular jazz sound.

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In Pennsylvania, they are rationing booze.

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UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER #1: If you go to a state store, you may only be allowed to buy two bottles of your favorite alcohol.

It has been 30 years since Dan Savage started his column "Savage Love" to answer questions about sex, love and relationships.

He's celebrating the anniversary with a new book, Savage Love from A to Z, an illustrated collection of essays with one for each letter of the alphabet.

Things have changed a lot from when he started writing about sex in The Stranger, Seattle's alternative weekly newspaper, in 1991.

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It powers so many aspects of modern American life - electricity.

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It was July 8, some two months ago, when President Biden recommitted to ending America's longest war.

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As President Biden laid out his plan to combat this latest surge of the coronavirus, he asked doctors to help.

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