Robin Shackleford

Indiana Black Legislative Caucus Unveils 2020 Agenda

Jan 14, 2020

The Indiana Black Legislative Caucus wants the state to push forward measures that will improve prescription drug costs, children’s health and jail overcrowding.

Indiana Black Legislative Caucus Chair Rep. Robin Shackleford (D-Indianapolis) says part of the 2019 town halls will focus on the importance of citizen advocacy. (Lauren Chapman/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

The Indiana Black Legislative Caucus will hold a series of town halls in communities across the state over the next few months.

Members of the Indiana House Republican Caucus present their 2019 legislative agenda. (Steve Burns/WTIU)
Brandon Smith

Indiana House Republicans will prioritize driving more dollars to the classroom to help boost teacher pay this legislative session. The caucus rolled out its 2019 legislative agenda Monday.

Lauren Chapman / IPB News

House lawmakers unanimously passed legislation Monday to require all Indiana public schools to offer a computer science course.

Nearly half of all Indiana public schools currently offer computer science classes. Rep. Robin Shackleford (D-Indianapolis) says the legislation she co-sponsors to spread that to all schools will help address Indiana’s skills gap.

“We have over four thousand current jobs available in computer science and we don’t have enough people to fill these jobs,” Shackleford says.

A proposed traffic amnesty program would help Hoosiers pay back debts and reinstate suspended licenses. It could allow more than 400,000 Hoosiers to become legal, licensed drivers once again.

Nearly one in 10 Hoosiers have suspended licenses because of financial reasons – not safety violations – according a report from students at Indiana University.

courtesy Indiana Black Legislative Caucus

Members of the Indiana Black Legislative Caucus will kick off a series of meetings later this month aimed, in part, at convincing Hoosiers that similar issues affect rural and urban areas of the state.

And, says caucus member Robin Shackleford (D-Indianapolis), the meetings are a way to work across the aisle, too.

“We’re talking about things that would benefit everyone – that are good for everyone – that the conservative side actually authored a lot of this legislation,” Shackleford says.

www.flickr.com/photos/giomio/4318389521

A food desert is a neighborhood with low, or no access to fresh fruits and vegetables, or dairy and meats.

It is a growing national problem, and in Indiana 59 percent of counties have food deserts.

Some state lawmakers have proposed legislation to fight the problem.

But Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Jill Sheridan found much of the work remains with non-profits and community organizations.

It’s after school at IPS 58, a grade school in Indianapolis.