Ask The Mayor

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, a study shows more housing units will be needed in the downtown Lafayette area in the next few years to meet demand—and that both older and younger professionals looking to move there are part of that equation. How does the city create a downtown that appeals to everyone?

In this week's talk with Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski, we’ll discuss concerns surrounding road construction and traffic at the Sagamore Parkway and State Road 26 intersection--and how about those decorative lights?

City of West Lafayette

 

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we’re going back to school. School shootings have dominated the headlines over the past year, and the state of Indiana is supplying free handheld metal detectors to schools who request them--but will the West Lafayette School Corporation sign on? What’s the best way to ensure safety, with an awareness of gun violence heightened after the Noblesville shooting in May?

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Cities of all sizes have their issues. Large burgs like Indianapolis often have high rates of poverty and homelessness and often not enough services to help those in need. Small municipalities frequently don’t look like inviting places to invest, so they frequently are happy if they’re keeping the lights on and not losing residents.

But this week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, a question from a listener causes us to ponder this question: is the city of Crawfordsville’s population – about 16,000 people – exactly the wrong size? That’s one of our queries for Mayor Todd Barton.

City of Frankfort

The Wabash Heartland Innovation Network has released a survey to gather information, including how residents of Frankfort really feel about Frankfort. On WBAA’s Ask the Mayor, we put Chris McBarnes to the same test.

We also ask about the state of renewable energy in Frankfort, just after a proposal from the state’s power agency to land a solar park in the city. We find out not just the solar power in question, but the project’s power with potential investors as well.

City of West Lafayette

We’ll know Friday evening what a week of public input has done to change the plans for a redeveloped Chauncey Hill Mall.

It’s perhaps the most valuable piece of land in West Lafayette, and Mayor John Dennis – our guest this week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor – will have to balance the desire for something a little more eye-catching, clean and modern with the nostalgia some people appear to have for a piece of property that’s never really lived up to its potential.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski has already announced his intention to run for a fifth term in office when next year’s elections roll around. But this week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we ponder whether the increasingly nasty tone of this year’s races is causing him to think about what may be a more bruising political climate when he runs next.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

The city of Crawfordsville recently celebrated the return of the Montgomery County Courthouse Clock Tower after 70 years – you can see it well down US-231, but local leaders say it’s more than just a physical marker.

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we’re talking visibility.

City of Frankfort

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we talk with Frankfort Mayor Chris McBarnes about downtown revitalization. Frankfort is struggling to fill agribusiness and manufacturing jobs, so the city is trying to improve life outside of work, and focusing on parks and apartments to build a larger employee pool.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

After Lafayette lost a prominent sports event and cancelled two summer festivals, the city’s left to fill those gaps in the calendar.

The Taste of Tippecanoe is just days away, and it’s always a big draw for the city – but there may be a wave of Lafayette-branded events on the horizon for the city’s redeveloped hot spots.

City of West Lafayette

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we’re digging into West Lafayette’s growing pains. One of the city's roundabout projects just won an award, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t complaints. And, the city is gearing up for several more development projects both downtown and near the local airport. So how does a city maintain – or shape a new – identity when so much of the past has to be torn down?

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