climate change

Climate change can be a polarizing topic to discuss outside of the scientific community. And Linda Prokopy, a professor of natural resource social science, didn’t mince words at recent talk about public attitudes toward climate change.

Pointing toward a Power Point presentation with the word “belief” in quotation marks, she says, “Climate change is a scientific fact, so you can’t really believe or not believe in a fact.”

courtesy Mayors National Climate Change Agenda

West Lafayette Mayor John Dennis has joined a growing group of municipal leaders opposed to Donald Trump’s removal of the United States from the Paris Climate Accord.

Dennis says he has joined a group of more than 200 so-called “Climate Mayors” nationwide, who’ve pledged their cities will uphold environmental regulations, even as the President seeks to escape them.

Dennis says he disagrees with assertions from Trump and many other Republicans that environmental rules are job-killers.

City of West Lafayette

The summer construction season is now in full force and you, the listeners to WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, have many questions about it.

This week, we put those to West Lafayette’s John Dennis and ask him whether he’s surprised that a project as talked about as State Street is still creating as much consternation as it is.

Also on this week’s program, will West Lafayette join the list of hundreds of other cities standing opposed to President Trump’s decision to pull the U.S. out of the Paris climate change agreement?

President Donald Trump called the Paris climate accord “draconian” and “onerous” when he announced the U.S. would withdraw from the agreement, but the decision’s benefits to Indiana’s energy landscape are unclear.

Countries plan for themselves how to make the effects of climate change less severe under the Paris climate agreement. Generally, countries can adopt renewable energy sources, limit carbon emissions, or do both.

A team led by professors at Purdue University is wrapping up a six-year project with Midwestern corn farmers to help them adapt to climate change.

Useful to Useable was a $5 million project funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Linda Prokopy, a professor of Natural Resources Social Sciences at Purdue University, says the aim wasn’t only to help farmers.

“My motivation was to really figure out how we can help farmers help themselves and help the land and help the water by having better access to information,” Prokopy says.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

For much of the last week, students have been camped out in Purdue University’s administration building, hoping for a meeting with President Mitch Daniels.

They’ve got demands about how the school handles diversity that they want met before they leave. But it’s unclear whether the president will see them.

On this edition of WBAA’s Monthly Conversation with Mitch Daniels, we ask if their demands are reasonable and we hear what steps the president is definitely NOT willing to take.

Tom Gill / https://www.flickr.com/photos/lapstrake/16144565664

Indiana’s Dunes National Lakeshore is helping scientists study the effects of climate change on maple syrup production. The park is the only site in the Midwest to take part in the study.

University of Massachusetts Amherst professor Joshua Rapp says Indiana is an important location for the study. It’s near the western edge of maple trees’ natural range-- which runs from Canada to Virginia, and the Atlantic to the Midwest.

The study looks at the ways a changing climate will affect the chemistry and sugar content of maple sap.

Niels Paul / https://www.flickr.com/photos/nureinpaarfotos/4481300759

A group of Indiana climate scientists say the Pence administration doesn’t understand the science of climate change and needs to take action to address the issue.

Gabriel Filippelli is an IUPUI earth sciences professor and led a group of scientists in penning a letter to Governor Mike Pence.  Filippelli says the reality of climate change – and that humans are largely responsible for it – is no longer debated by the scientific community. 

Audubon Report Shows Climate Change Affecting Bird Migration

Sep 10, 2014
Bill Gracey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/9422878@N08/8438709330

A new Audubon Society report claims the combination of climate change and habitat destruction could put a large number of North American bird populations at risk sooner rather than later.

The report predicts that, of the 588 North American bird species observed in the study, 314 are at risk because of decreased climatic range due to rising temperatures over the next century. 

For example, a bird spending winters in Mississippi could soon spend winters in Missouri.  

Study suggests trees dealing with climate change

Jul 15, 2013
Indiana Department of Natural Resources

Some trees seem to be adapting to climate change by using less water. That’s the conclusion a team of researchers from several universities has recently published in the journal Nature.

Using atmospheric devices on a 150 foot high tower in the Morgan Monroe State Forest, Indiana University researchers measured how much water vapor and gases were being absorbed and released by the forest.

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