Governor's Workforce Cabinet

The Department of Workforce Development is proposing a cut in state funding for several life-skills classes that teach things like basic nutrition and personal finance. The plan has upset some teachers and education officials. 

The Governor’s Workforce Cabinet is getting public input on the state’s workforce programs to shape a federal funding proposal. The cabinet held its ninth listening session across the state in South Bend.

An online learning company will soon be given state funding to help adults get their high school diploma. It’s the first organization approved to receive grant money from the Workforce Diploma Reimbursement fund.

The Governor's Workforce Cabinet voted to award several large grants at a meeting Thursday in Indianapolis. But some cabinet members were concerned they didn’t have enough information about the proposals they were voting on.

Workforce Cabinet Announces New Grant

Jun 13, 2019

The Indiana Governor’s Workforce Cabinet announced a new workforce grant Wednesday afternoon intended to help local workforce development efforts.

Starting next month teachers will need to spend time focused on career awareness in order to renew their licenses. More than 22,700 – about a third of all teachers in the state – have started the process to renew their licenses compared to just 514 at this time last year.

Adult Diploma Reimbursement Signed Into Law

May 7, 2019
The bill will fund adult high school diploma programs based on performance – not just enrollment. (Brandon Smith/IPB News)
Lauren Chapman

Gov. Eric Holcomb signed a bill into law this week that will fund adult high school diploma programs based on performance – not just enrollment. The requirements will affect programs across the state.

Gov. Eric Holcomb and legislators pose with students at Seymour High School after signing a career and technical education bill into law. (Zachary Herndon/WTIU)
Justin Hicks

Gov. Eric Holcomb signed a career and technical education bill into law Tuesday afternoon at a high school manufacturing center in Seymour, Indiana. 

A bill that would overhaul career and technical education across the state passed the general assembly Tuesday night. It would create several changes if signed by the governor.

James Vavrek / WFIU/WTIU News

 

The Indiana Department of Workforce Development estimates there will be more than one million jobs to fill in the state by 2024 – and most of them won’t require a college degree.

Instead, many employers will be looking for highly-skilled workers with specialized certificates to fill positions in everything from manufacturing to healthcare.