Lafayette Police Department

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

As a former police officer himself, it would seem to make sense that Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski supports a new income tax to fund public safety. His city saw a crime spike just a few years ago, but it’s been easing off the last couple years. So with crime on the decline under the current budget, why is now the right time to raise taxes to fight it?

We put that question to him today on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor.

Also on this week’s show, why has Mayor Roswarski decided not to go on an annual trip to Washington, D.C. to talk with Indiana Congresspeople?

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA

Lafayette’s Police Department has determined Officer Aaron Wright shot fellow officer Lane Butler accidentally this week. Body camera footage shared by the department Friday showed how rapidly events unfolded during Tuesday morning’s incident.

Body camera videos from all three officers shows a methodical apartment search that ends explosively when a large dog, which can be glimpsed throughout the footage, breaks free of its wire cage.

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

 UPDATED (Thursday, 2:15 p.m.):

Sergeant Matt Gard confirms the shooting review board will consist of the deputy chief of police, the captain of the patrol division, the captain of the investigation division, Officer Aaron Wright’s commanding officer, and two department members of the same rank. The breed of the dog in Tuesday’s incident was a Cane Corso, otherwise known as an Italian Mastiff.  

 UPDATED: (Thursday, 11:50 a.m.):                     

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

There’s a meeting scheduled for later this month in Lafayette to talk about the city’s drug addiction issues. Registration to speak was so popular the venue had to be changed to accommodate more people.

This week on WBAA’s “Ask The Mayor,” we chat with Lafayette’s Tony Roswarski about what that says for a city that’s struggled to even keep drug use from growing in recent years.

Lafayette Police To 'Take Back' Unused Medicine, Needles

Jul 25, 2017
J J / flickr.com/photos/tattoodjay/4172577749

The Lafayette Police Department is asking residents to bring unwanted drugs and needles to them, instead of flushing them down the toilet or giving them away.

The LPD is hosting a ‘drug takeback’ event this weekend in an effort to keep substances like unused opioids off the streets and out of the water – but it’s not primarily addressed at the types of drugs Lafayette is having the most trouble policing, such as heroin.

Sgt. Matt Gard says even if a person brings illicit drugs or a prescription that isn’t theirs, they should feel safe to let the police dispose of it.

J J / flickr.com/photos/tattoodjay/4172577749

Update, 1:10 p.m.: All public safety phone lines are fully functional at this time.

Phone lines at Tippecanoe County’s public safety departments spent most of this morning running on a backup system to receive non-emergency calls.

West Lafayette Mayor John Dennis says a power outage at the county jail knocked out a phone server, and took down the non-emergency lines.

Tippecanoe County Sheriff Barry Richard says though the primary line went out, a secondary system took over for the administrative phones.

Photo courtesy Lafayette Police Department

A new bill offered in the Indiana legislature would levy harsher penalties for crimes against public safety officials. It also strengthens penalties for crimes against their relatives.

Police Body Cam Footage Costs Public $150, Officers Time

Dec 21, 2016
Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

Earlier this year, a state law mandated that a police department could not charge more than $150 for a copy of police body camera footage. The question now: Is $150 a fair price or might it have a cooling effect on people seeking video? WBAA’s Charlotte Tuggle reports. 

Police departments across Indiana are grappling with the cost of body-worn camera technology.

Some have quit the process altogether, saying the expense is too great for their department – even if they can recoup $150 every time someone asks for footage.

LPD Sergeant Worries A Needle Exchange Is A Bad Idea

Nov 2, 2016
Steve Burns / WTIU

The sergeant who oversees the Lafayette Police Department’s street crimes unit says he’s worried creating a needle exchange program will flood Tippecanoe County with heroin addicts.

“That word gets out and everyone says 'oh we can go to Tippecanoe County and we can get free needles' and then they come here and don’t leave," Adam Mellady says.

Mellady says he also worries adopting the needle exchange program is against at least the spirit of state law.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

This is a story about a house.

But first, some background on how this house, in Lafayette’s Columbian Park neighborhood, came to be this story’s main character.

In February, after months of citizen concern about a crime spike, Lafayette’s police chief held a press conference.

Pat Flannelly talked about the tools at his disposal – everything from squad cars to software.

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