Richard Gonzales

Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco. Along with covering the daily news of region, Gonzales' reporting has included medical marijuana, gay marriage, drive-by shootings, Jerry Brown, Willie Brown, the U.S. Ninth Circuit, the California State Supreme Court and any other legal, political, or social development occurring in Northern California relevant to the rest of the country.

Gonzales joined NPR in May 1986. He covered the U.S. State Department during the Iran-Contra Affair and the fall of apartheid in South Africa. Four years later, he assumed the post of White House Correspondent and reported on the prelude to the Gulf War and President George W. Bush's unsuccessful re-election bid. Gonzales covered the U.S. Congress for NPR from 1993-94, focusing on NAFTA and immigration and welfare reform.

In September 1995, Gonzales moved to his current position after spending a year as a John S. Knight Fellow Journalism at Stanford University.

In 2009, Gonzales won the Broadcast Journalism Award from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. He also received the PASS Award in 2004 and 2005 from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency for reports on California's juvenile and adult criminal justice systems.

Prior to NPR, Gonzales was a freelance producer at public television station KQED in San Francisco. From 1979 to 1985, he held positions as a reporter, producer, and later, public affairs director at KPFA, a radio station in Berkeley, CA.

Gonzales graduated from Harvard College with a bachelor's degree in psychology and social relations. He is a co-founder of Familias Unidas, a bi-lingual social services program in his hometown of Richmond, California.

The Supreme Court says the Trump administration can begin denying asylum requests from migrants arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border nationwide who have not first applied in another country they traveled through.

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Updated at 9:40 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the Trump administration may curtail asylum applications at the southern border while a legal challenge to the new rule is litigated in court.

A mass stampede at a Shia Muslim shrine in the Iraqi city of Karbala left at least 31 people dead and about 100 injured. Ten of the injured are in critical condition, according to local officials, and the death toll could rise.

There are conflicting reports on what caused the stampede as thousands of Shia Muslims gathered for the Ashoura commemoration of the death of Imam Hussein, the grandson of the Prophet Muhammad, who died in battle in the year 680.

A jury in Oakland., Calif., has acquitted one of two men of involuntary manslaughter for his part in organizing a party at a warehouse known as the "Ghost Ship" that turned into a deadly inferno, claiming the lives of 36 people, in December 2016.

A Texas death row inmate was executed Wednesday by lethal injection for the 2003 fatal stabbing of two women, an elderly mother and her daughter, who had angered him when they were unable to provide him with enough work at their home for him to sustain himself.

Billy Jack Crutsinger, 64, died at the state penitentiary in Huntsville 13 minutes after receiving a lethal dose of pentobarbital.

A state appeals court in California overturned the sole conviction of a homeless undocumented immigrant who admitted to handling a gun that killed Kate Steinle, a San Francisco woman who died on a city pier in 2015.

Steinle's death fueled the national debate over illegal immigration as then-candidate Donald Trump invoked the case in his 2016 presidential campaign speeches as evidence of a need to crackdown on immigration.

Updated at 6:37 p.m. ET

Autopsy results for Los Angeles Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs revealed the presence of opioids and alcohol in his body after he was found dead in a Texas hotel room on July 1.

The toxicology report released Friday by the Tarrant County medical examiner says the cause of death was a mixture of "alcohol, fentanyl and oxycodone intoxication" and that Skaggs essentially choked on his vomit while under the influence.

Updated on Tuesday at 5:43 p.m. ET

In a long overdue tribute to the first African American to break international tennis' color barrier, a new statue of Althea Gibson was unveiled at the opening day of the U.S. Open.

The statue is comprised of five granite blocks and created by American sculptor Eric Goulder. It sits outside Arthur Ashe Stadium at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Queens, New York.

Nineteen states and the District of Columbia are suing the Trump administration over its plan to pull out of a decades-old court settlement that governs the care of migrant children in federal detention.

The Trump administration is making changes to the agency that operates the nation's immigration court system, a move immediately denounced by the immigration judges' union as a power grab.

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