education funding

Eric Weddle/Indiana Public Media

When she leaves office at the end of next year, Indiana education superintendent Jennifer McCormick will become the last person to be elected Indiana’s top educator. The position will be appointed by the governor starting in 2021 – a choice no longer afforded to the voters.

McCormick visited West Lafayette recently and WBAA’s Stan Jastrzebski sat down with her to talk about choices – including how parents choose schools and how she crafts the next step in her career.

General Assembly Passes Two-Year Budget

Apr 25, 2019

Hoosiers now know what the state budget will look like for the next two years. It boosts funding for education, but schools with declining enrollment will still lose money.

House Republicans Unveil Proposed Budget

Feb 18, 2019
Rep. Todd Huston (R-Fishers) is an architect of the House Republican budget proposal. (Lauren Chapman/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Indiana House Republicans want to increase education funding by about 2 percent each year in the new state budget – little more than inflation.

Indiana schools stand to lose about $56 million for teacher training and after school programs for low-income students, under proposed budget cuts by President Donald Trump’s administration.

Jennifer McCormick, Indiana superintendent of public instruction, says the proposed budget would be “a big hit” to the state. She says cuts would hamper efforts to attract teachers, stifle new programs under a new federal education law and reduce programs for low-income students.

 

Indiana’s public college and university presidents made their case in a Senate budget hearing at the Statehouse for funding increases Tuesday.

Each university presentation to lawmakers generally goes the same way: the school president talks about what their school does well, how they’re improving, and then how much money they want.

In some cases, as with Indiana University’s President Michael McRobbie, the school president frets over the budget bill’s funding increases.

Lawmakers Preach Caution As Colleges Ask For Funding

Dec 8, 2016

 

Indiana’s public colleges and universities appeared before the State Budget Committee to make their cases for funding requests. But lawmakers weren’t very encouraging.

Some lawmakers preached caution during the schools’ presentations, sounding rather pessimistic about how much money the state will have in its new budget.

Indiana University, represented by CFO John Sejdinaj, preemptively acknowledged those concerns.

Rachel Morello/Indiana Public Broadcasting

A pre-K advocacy group made up of Indiana businesses and philanthropic organizations asked a group of legislators on Wednesday to give more funding to pre-K scholarships for low-income families, and legislators pushed back.

The advocacy group, which includes representatives from United Way, Eli Lilly and PNC Bank, among others, testified before the interim study committee on fiscal policy.  The committee will have influence over what is included in the state budget when the General Assembly convenes in January.

Pictures of Money / https://www.flickr.com/photos/pictures-of-money/

As enrollment drops in the state’s rural schools, educators are left with a big challenge – find money to teach the kids who remain.

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Peter Balonon-Rosen takes us back to a small northern Indiana school district where administrators spent the final day of the academic year scrambling to figure out how they will manage when classes resume in the fall.    

Ivy Tech

The Indiana General Assembly allocated nearly $2 billion for the state’s colleges in this year's budget – including money for new building projects. The only institution that didn’t receive funding for one of those projects is Ivy Tech Community College.    

​Senator Luke Kenley (R-Noblesville) was one of the architects of that $31 billion budget Gov. Mike Pence signed into law. As he was reviewing requests from the state’s colleges for more than $761 million in capital projects, there was a phone call.

Rachel Morello / StateImpact Indiana

Lawmakers spent a good deal of time this year reworking the way schools are funded – not just public schools, but charter schools too. These alternative institutions saw a pretty big swing in their favor in the new biennial budget, as they now have access to additional money they can use to pay for things like buildings, technology, and transportation- something they didn’t have access to before.

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